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COURTS   OF   PARIS,    NAPLESj   ETC,                147

accounts, and promises to increase in power and
reputation of genius.

The Republic requires to fall into the hands
of some able charioteer. At present, money is so
much the deity of every man's worship, and those
who acquire it lavish it so profusely in the grati-
fication of every passion, that one can form no
guess when any great and good man is to make
his appearance. But if the present powers can
but keep the country quiet, the vast bulk alone
of the Empire will settle itself into consistency
and order by its own weight. Thirty-six millions
of men will not long continue in an uncomfortable
situation where the force is in their own hands;
and, by degrees, that regularity and order ne-
cessary for the existence even of a gang of
robbers must overpower anarchy and vice, or
perish.

You will laugh, perhaps, at all this political
tirade;—but I am quietly seated by my fireside,
waiting for a person to go and see Mr. Boyd's
house and furniture, from which I have got the
seals removed; and I' put down my ideas as
they arise, by way of conversation with you.

You must expect, in the course of corre-
spondence, many variations in my opinion, because
every day presents objects in a different light,

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